PG Phriday: Derivation Deluge

Having run into a [intlink id='pg-phriday-growing-pains']bit of a snag[/intlink] with Postgres-XL, and not wanting to be dead in the water with our project, I went on a bit of a knowledge quest. Database scaling is hard, so I expected a bunch of either abandoned or proprietary approaches. In addition, as a huge fans of Postgres, compatibility or outright use of the Postgres core was a strict prerequisite.

So, what options are out there? Is there even anything worth further investigation? Maybe more importantly, what do you do when you’re under a bit of a scheduling constraint? Projects need to move forward after all, and regardless of preferences, sometimes concessions are necessary. The first step was obviously the list of databases derived from Postgres.

PG Phriday: Growing Pains

Postgres is a great tool for most databases. Larger installations however, pretty much require horizontal scaling; addressing multi-TB tables relies on multiple parallel storage streams thanks to the laws of physics. It’s how all immense data stores work, and for a long time, Postgres really had no equivalent that wasn’t a home-grown shard management wrapper. To that end, we’ve been considering Postgres-XL as a way to fill that role. At first, everything was going well. Performance tests showed huge improvements, initial deployments uncovered no outright incompatibilities, and the conversion was underway.

Then we started to use it.

PG Phriday: JOIN the Club

I’ve been going on and on about esoteric Postgres features for so long, sometimes I forget my own neophyte beginnings. So let’s back way off and talk about how JOINs work. What are they? What do they do? Why would you use one? What can go wrong? It’s easier than you might imagine, but there are definitely some subtleties to account for.

PG Phriday: 5 Reasons Postgres Sucks! (You Won’t Believe Number 3!)

I’ve been a Postgres DBA since 2005. After all that time, I’ve come to a conclusion that I’m embarrassed I didn’t reach much earlier: Postgres is awful. This isn’t a “straw that broke the camel’s back” kind of situation; there is a litany of ridiculous idiocy in the project that’s, frankly, more than enough to stave off any DBA, end user, or developer. But I’ll limit my list to five, because clickbait.