PG Phriday: Sidewinder

Maintaining a Postgres database can involve a lot of busywork. This is especially true for more robust architectures that allocate at least one replica for failover purposes. It’s still fairly common for a DBA to create a replica to accommodate emergency or upgrade scenarios, only to have to repeat the process when it came time to revert to the original master system. It’s not safe to simply subscribe the original primary to the newly promoted secondary, so this leaves either creating a new clone, or using rsync to synchronize all of the files first.

PG Phriday: High Availability Through Delayed Replication

High availability of PostgreSQL databases is incredibly important to me. You might even say it’s a special interest of mine. It’s one reason I’m both excited and saddened by a feature introduced in 9.4. I’m Excited because it’s a feature I plan to make extensive use of, and saddened because it has flown under the radar thus far. It’s not even listed in the What’s new in PostgreSQL 9.4 Wiki page. If they’ll let me, I may have to rectify that.

What is this mysterious change that has me drooling all over my keyboard? The new recovery_min_apply_delay standby server setting. In name and intent, it forces a standby server to delay application of upstream changes. The implications, however, are much, much more important.