PG Phriday: Moving to 9.5

There comes a day in every young database’s life that it’s time to move on. I’m sorry 9.4, but the day has come that we must say goodbye. It’s not like we haven’t had our [intlink id='pg-phriday-high-availability-through-delayed-replication']good times[/intlink]. While I truly appreciate everything you’ve [intlink id='pg-phriday-materialized-views-revisited']done for me[/intlink], we must part ways. I’m far too needy, and I can’t demand so much of you in good conscience. May your future patches make you and your other suitors happy!

PG Phriday: Secret of the Ooze

A few days ago, a developer came to me with that inevitable scenario that every DBA secretly dreads: a need for a dynamic table structure. After I’d finished dying inside, I explained the various architectures that could give him what he needed, and then I excused myself to another room so I could weep silently without disturbing my coworkers. But was it really that bad? Databases have come a long way since the Bad Old Days when there were really only two viable approaches to table polymorphism. Postgres in particular adds two options that greatly reduce the inherent horror of The Blob. In fact, I might even say its a viable strategy now that Postgres JSON support is so good.

PG Phriday: JSON and JSONB Revisited

With Postgres 9.5 on the horizon, I figured it’s a good time to see how things have advanced since my [intlink id='pg-phriday-functions-and-addressing-json-data']last dive[/intlink] into that particular ocean. This is probably particularly relevant since even MongoDB, a JSON-driven NoSQL database, is now partially powered by Postgres. A lot of people found that particular revelation quite shocking, but maybe they shouldn’t, given the advancements embedded within the last couple of Postgres releases.