PG Phriday: Primal Planner Prep

The Postgres query planner is house of cards built upon the ever-shifting sand of our data. It has the utterly impossible mission of converting our ridiculous and inane requests into a logical series of fetch, filter, sort, join, and other instructions. Then the resulting steps must be ruthlessly efficient or the execution phase could very well saturate every hardware resource available; Set Theory isn’t very forgiving.

Forewarned is forearmed is very apt when applied to database query planners. Without proper statistics, they are reduced to assumptions that make adequate first approximations. But scale is the utter enemy of imprecision, as multiplicative effects quickly overwhelm reality. This allows seemingly simple report scripts to fall endlessly into a pit of smoldering system resources.

PG Phriday: Being A Tattletale

In a heterogeneous database environment, it’s not uncommon for object creation and modification to occur haphazardly. Unless permissions are locked down to prevent it, users and applications will create tables, modify views, or otherwise invoke DDL without the DBA’s knowledge. Or perhaps permissions are exceptionally draconian, yet they’ve been circumvented or a superuser account has gone rogue. Maybe we just need to audit database modifications to fulfill oversight obligations. Whatever the reason, Postgres has it covered with event triggers.

PG Phriday: Replacing Business Logic

Back in 2005, I started a new job with a company that did work for other businesses. Their data model was designed by developers and they had no DBA, as is pretty common in smaller organizations. A critical part of our main application relied on an event log that captured customer activity and relayed their final decision to the client for reconciliation. One day someone noticed that there was a bug in the system that resolved the final decision from the event stack, and panic ensued. I put a lot of thought into it that night and had a fix for it the next morning. As usual, my approach relied on Postgres, and carried a fun lesson.